Press

February 2018


March 2018


Fab UK Magazine:

Improve your mindfulness to help your health!

Maija Kivelä, Yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme (www.maitreofthyme.com) explains, “Yoga can increase your mindfulness and as a result, individuals will become more aware of what they are eating and make better eating choices. Yoga helps with increased flexibility and muscle strength, improved respiration, energy and vitality, maintaining a healthy metabolism, weight management and cardio and circulatory health. I really hope that my classes will not only support physical and mental strength but also perfect students’ postures, make them happier and help them to follow a healthier lifestyle.”

Iceni Magazine:

Get your mind ready for weight loss

“Yoga can increase mindfulness and individuals will become more aware of what they are eating and make better eating choices, which will certainly help weight management,” explains Maija Kivelä, Yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme (www.maitreofthyme.com).

My Weekly Magazine:

Improve your mindfulness to help your health!

Maija Kivelä, Yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme  explains, “Yoga can increase your mindfulness and, as a result, individuals will become more aware of what they are eating and make better eating choices. Yoga helps with increased flexibility and muscle strength, improved respiration, energy and vitality, maintaining a healthy metabolism, weight management and cardio and circulatory health. I really hope that my classes will not only support physical and mental strength but also perfect students’ postures, make them happier and help them to follow a healthier lifestyle.”

Your Coffee Break Magazine:

Take up Pilates

Eleonora Sansoni, instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme “Pilates has a strengthening component making you feel taller and leaner, but due to the nature of its exercises, it doesn’t specifically address lipidic compositions. However, I believe that the plethora of benefits that Pilates has like an increase in strength and flexibility, better postural awareness and becoming more body-aware can have a positive impact on people’s beliefs and attitudes towards sports and activity. More confidence with movements could lead to approaching activity designed for weight loss with a reduced risk of injuries and faster results. There isn’t a specific move that achieves this; just regular, consistent and bespoke Pilates training.”

Iceni Magazine:

Put your health first with Pilates

“Recent studies have shown that Pilates exercise has a direct and indirect positive impact on immune function and on the lymphatic system. Pilates helps with enhancing breathing patterns, the general joint range of motion, cardiovascular pump and muscle activation. All of these benefits combined together contribute to support your general health and wellbeing and therefore affect our immune systems as well. there isn’t a specific move that achieves this; just regular, consistent and bespoke Pilates training,” explains Eleonora Sansoni, Osteopath and Pilates Instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme (www.maitreofthyme.com).

Your Coffee Break Magazine:

Take up yoga

Maija Kivelä, Yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme suggests trying Restorative yoga. “Restorative yoga seeks to achieve physical, mental and emotional relaxation. It provides healing for the body and the mind. It is a mellow and slow-paced style of yoga that will have you holding positions for longer. This style focuses on poses that invigorate your immune system and stretch out the aches and pains of the week,” explains Maija.

Fab UK Magazine:

Incorporate Pilates

As well as increasing your aerobic exercise, you should also look to lower-intensity exercises to compliment your body’s physical and mental performance. “Pilates can aid any sport or fitness regime because it gives you the base strengthening to feel stronger, the right flexibility to prevent injury and the body awareness to perform effectively. I believe that the plethora of benefits that Pilates has like making you stronger, more flexible and more body-aware can have a positive impact on people’s beliefs and attitudes towards sports and activity. More confidence with movements could lead to approaching activity designed for weight loss with a reduced risk of injuries and faster results,” explains Eleonora Sansoni, instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme (www.maitreofthyme.com).

Unwind with yoga

[…]

Maija Kivelä, Yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme (www.maitreofthyme.com) suggests restorative yoga. She explains, “Restorative yoga seeks to achieve physical, mental and emotional relaxation. It provides healing for the body and the mind. It is a mellow and slow-paced style of yoga that will have you holding positions for longer. This style focuses on poses that invigorate your immune system and stretch out the aches and pains of the week.”

Women’s Health Magazine:

3. DON’T FORGET TO STRETCH

“Pilates strengthens and stretches the body from the inside by activating the deeper postural muscles that wouldn’t otherwise be activated during harder or more dynamic workouts,” says Eleonora Sansoni, an instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme. “Regular and consistent Reformer Pilates training can lead to an increase in fitness levels and muscle tone by improving the muscle tone of both the deeper and more superficial muscles.”

On In London Magazine:

Maître of Thyme is a Holistic Wellness Boutique opening this week on Great Portland street.

The boutique offers a range of highest quality, organic hand selected products to suit each individual’s needs and taste from all over the world. Ranging from skin care products to the many food items available, you can find what you’re after here. The stores layout is intriguing, using some of the original shelving arrangement from the store that came before them (specsavers) to showcase their products.

Work your way downstairs, should you have an appointment and try out one of their classes. Whether it be Yoga, Pilates or Reformer Pilates they’ve got you covered.Maybe you need a consultation with the Osteopath? Whatever your choice, you will find your sanctum here.

Yoga and Pilates classes are offered as either a 1:1 or 3:1 basis. Bring along a friend or two and share this quality service. No matter the level you or your friends may be at, you will be taken care of by Maître of Thyme professionals. They cater for each individual, seeing as the classes are so small, it really becomes a more personal experience for you. You will not just ‘get lost in a crowd of people’ and you will never feel like you are just a number. Classes will begin in April.

Maître of Thymes mission is a simple but ideal one. They want to educate and support you in taking back control of your health. It is all about treating your mind, body and soul.  Really, what more could you want? This is something that everyone should be thinking more about in their daily life. London lifestyle is a pretty hectic one and we tend to put our needs behind everything else. We forget to nourish it properly, to care for it and we forget to listen to what it tells us. Having somewhere out there that’s reminding us to pay attention to our bodies is what we need more of!

Book online to secure your place.

Website: http://maitreofthyme.com

Address: 130 Great Portland Street

London W1W 6PT

Twitter: https://twitter.com/maitreofthyme

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/maitreofthyme

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/maitreofthyme

Written by: Bec Brodie

April 2018


Jersey Evening Post:

1st April 2018 

The Fuss Magazine:

FAT-FREE MILK

Francesca Cappozzo, a nutritionist at Maître of Thyme explains that fat-free milk isn’t often the best choice because of the sugar that’s added to ensure it doesn’t taste bad or bland. Instead, full-fat milk is the better option even though it’s higher in calories. This could be the best option because the fat is slowly digested and keeps you fuller for longer too.

Amor Magazine:

1. Ditch fat-free milk

“Don’t choose fat-free alternatives of milks as they are usually enriched with sugar to cover the bland taste. Full fat is better because fat, even if it has more calories, is slowly digested and promotes satiety, and in my opinion tastes 100% better,” explains Francesca Cappozzo, Nutritionist at Maître of Thyme (maitreofthyme.com).

Andover and Villages Magazine:

Mindfulness tip:

Feeling stressed trying to conceive? Try Restorative yoga to calm your body and your mind. Maija Kivelä, yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme explains, “Restorative yoga is a mellow and slow-paced style of yoga that will have you holding positions longer. This style focuses on poses that invigorate your immune system and stretch out the aches and pains of the week.

Natural Products News Magazine:

Image coming soon.

My Weekly Magazine:

1 Ditch Fat-free Milk

“Don’t choose fat-free alternatives of milks as they are usually enriched with sugar to cover the bland taste. Full fat is better because fat, even if it has more calories, is slowly digested and promotes satiety, and in my opinion tastes 100% better,” explains Francesca Cappozzo, Nutritionist at Maître of Thyme.

4 Check For Chemicals

“Whenever you do your grocery shopping have a look at the label. You might find chemical names, such as sodium benzoate or monosodium glutamate. These substances are classified as additives and preservatives, defined as non-nutritive substances added intentionally to food, generally in small quantities to improve appearance, flavour, texture or storage properties. Amounts used in food are usually regulated by the law, although that doesn’t mean that they are harmless. Most of them create imbalances in our metabolism, so it is better to try and avoid them when possible,” suggests Francesca.

7 Be Cautious With Condiments

“Go slow with condiments, it’s very easy to make a healthy meal much heavier by simply pouring on too much dressing or oils,” explains Francesca.

Stoke On Trent Live Magazine:

I – Immunity

“Echinacea is most commonly used as a herbal immunostimulant. You can get Echinacea root and make a herbal tea or a herbal tincture to prevent flu symptoms and the common cold. It appears to increase red blood cell count and reduce the length of illness,” explains Francesca Cappozzo, Nutritionist at Maitre of Thyme ( www.maitreofthyme.com ).

P – Pilates

Young, old and all fitness levels can do Pilates. “The wider benefits of Pilates range from an increase in strength and flexibility, better postural awareness, a reduction of pain and an increased function to better sleep. Pilates has also been associated with improving mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, fatigue and fibromyalgia and reducing stress,” explains Eleonora Sansoni, Pilates Instructor at Maître of Thyme.

V – Vinyasa Flow

Invigorate your mind and body with yoga. Maija Kivelä, Yoga Instructor at Maître of Thyme explains, “Vinyasa Flow is afree-flow active style of yoga, which each teacher adapts and varies in style. Positions are not held for very long and you flow dynamically in and out of poses, linking movement to breath. This style is suitable for everyone who likes a lovely mix of movement, flexibility, strength and meditation.”

Parenting Without Tears Magazine:

I — Immunity

“Echinacea is most commonly used as a herbal immunostimulant. You can get Echinacea root and make a herbal tea or a herbal tincture to prevent flu symptoms and the coming cold. it appears to increase red blood cell count and reduce the length of illness,” explains Francesca Cappozzo, Nutritionist at Maître of Thyme.

P — Pilates

Young, old and all fitness levels can do Pilates. “The wider benefits of Pilates range from an increase in strength and flexibility, better postural awareness, a reduction of pain and an increased function to better sleep. Pilates has also been associated with improving mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, fatigue and fibromyalgia and reducing stress,” explains Eleonora Sansoni, Pilates Instructor at Maître of Thyme.

Women’s Health Magazine:

2. FUEL UP

You had a strict pre-marathon food eating plan so have one for post-marathon recovery, too, might sound pretty obvious. But, as you get swept away with friends and family celebrations, it’s easy to forget your nutrition. But what you choose to have for your post-marathon food is important. According to Francesca Cappozzo, nutritionist at Maître of Thyme, it:

• Replaces the fluid and electrolytes lost in sweat

• Replenishes muscle and liver glycogen stores (glucose, energy stores)

• Supports the repair of any damage caused by the exercise and builds new muscle as a response to the stimulus of exercise

• Ensures your immune system is working well

“Glycogen re-synthesis starts immediately after you reach the finish line and depends on the availability of glucose,” says Cappozzo. “It happens most rapidly during the first few hours of recovery. The best recovery strategy is to consume 50-75g of fast-release carbs with fluids and electrolytes, and a protein snack with 10 to 20g of good quality protein to repair damaged muscles. It’s better to not eat too many fibre-rich carbohydrates such as lentils and legumes in recovery meals, since these may be less suitable for quick glycogen storage.”

Wonder exactly what to do after a marathon in terms of food? Choose from Cappozzo’s recommendations:

• 60g breakfast cereal with a cup of milk

• A cheese/meat/chicken sandwich and one large piece of fruit or a 300ml sports drink

• A cup of fruit salad or a 300ml sports drink with 200g yoghurt

• 200g yoghurt or 300ml of milk and a banana or fruit of your choice

• 2 crumpets or bagels with a thick spread of crunchy nut butter (I love almond and cashew) or two slices of cheese

• 200g of baked beans on two slices of toast

• 250g of baked potato with cottage cheese or grated cheese

“If you choose to go to a local restaurant for a celebration meal then a good meal choice is a hearty stew full of spices or ramen noodles as they provide macros, fluid and electrolytes to replenish your body,” Cappozzo says.

And remember, it can take up to 20 hours to replenish your energy and fluid stores so aim to eat 50-75g of carbs every two hours until 500-700g has been consumed; or until you’ve have a large carb-heavy meal.

2. TRY AN ALTERNATIVE EXERCISE FORM

Completing a marathon, not to mention the months of training, puts your body under a lot of strain – especially for your muscles, bones and joints – so, when it comes to what exactly to do after a marathon, perhaps consider taking your training intensity down a notch. At first, at least.

“During a marathon the amount of muscle fibre activation and energy consumption to keep the body going is enormous,” says Eleonora Sansoni, Pilates instructor and osteopath at Maître of Thyme. “Running long distances can also be compressive onto your joints due to its repetitive motion nature. In order to recover from muscle exhaustion and general stiffness following a prolonged run it would be a great idea to take up Pilates. Pilates can stretch your body without overwhelming your muscles and, with the support of Pilates machines, it is possible to elongate and/or activate the muscles without further stressing of joints. Pilates is versatile and can be tailored for the individual’s post-marathon recovery needs by facilitating the removal of lactic acid, reducing inflammation and increasing fluid dynamics into your joints to promote recovery and optimise tissue healing.”

May 2018


Free-From Heaven Magazine:

‘Maija Kivelä, yoga instructor at the new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme (www.maitreofthyme.com) explains, “Due to our hectic lifestyles, mindfulness has become a huge trend. Yoga can increase your mindfulness and as a result, individuals will become more aware of what they are eating and make better eating choices, which will certainly help weight management. I really hope that my classes will not only support physical and mental strength but also perfect students’ postures, make them happier and help them to follow a healthier lifestyle.”‘

Cosmopolitan UK Magazine:

‘Francesca Cappozzo, Nutritionist at a new holistic wellness boutique, Maître of Thyme, explains: “IBS is not explained by identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities, so the symptoms are quite broad and tend to manifest with different intensities.”

Common IBS symptoms include abdominal pain and unpredictable, abnormal bowel movements, as well as excess wind. Healthy poo should be a regular consistency, and easy to pass without any pain. If it’s too hard or soft, there could be a problem.

Though it varies person to person, you should also be having a bowel movement between twice a day and a minimum of three times a week.

But IBS isn’t simply like having an upset stomach long-term.

You might have seen photos sufferers have posted of their swollen bellies, after eating something that disagreed with them. But while bloating is a common symptom, there are many others – some surprisingly contradictory. You can be constipated one minute, and have diarrhoea the next, for example.

“IBS is divided into four types,” says Francesca. “IBS-C, when there’s constipation, IBS-D with diarrhoea, IBS-M when there’s both hard and loose stool over a short period of time, and IBS-U, where bowel habits fluctuate problematically over a longer period of time.”

Less obvious symptoms

Other less common symptoms of the condition include:

  • a lack of energy
  • backache
  • feeling sick
  • bladder problems such as waking in the night desperate for the loo
  • incontinence
  • pain during sex

And with a condition so deeply linked to your lifestyle and mental health, IBS symptoms also work in something of a cycle.

“Unusual symptoms usually give away hidden conditions such as a food intolerance or allergy,” explains Francesca. “About two third of patients with IBS have food intolerances and usually foods rich in carbohydrates, fats, coffee, alcohol and hot spices can be problematic.”

Also, the causes can manifest as symptoms, and it can be hard to know which came first, and how to deal with them.

“IBS usually highly affects quality of life,” says Francesca. “Anxiety, fatigue, depression, hostile feelings and sleep disturbances are reported by almost all patients with IBS. But it can be difficult to tell if they’re caused by, or are the cause of, some people’s IBS.”

She continues: “Symptom severity and frequency are linked with these psychological factors. And poor sleep quality makes the symptoms much worse.”

If you’re in pain, and worried about it, it’s hard not to be anxious and sleepless, but these in turn make the condition worse.

“Another condition that often develops at the same time as IBS is Fibromyalgia, which is another chronic fatigue and pain condition,” says Francesca. While IBS causes pain in the abdomen, fibromylagia causes it throughout the body, so separating out the IBS can be tricky. Unfortunately, young to middle aged women are the most likely to present with both conditions.

What to do

The first point of call is your GP, who will be able to rule out any other conditions and give you an IBS diagnosis to help you begin treatment and lifestyle changes.

“You should notice at least three or more of the hallmark symptoms (e.g. bloating, abdominal pain and constipation),” says Francesca.

“But the most important thing is the regularity of these symptoms. If it’s more than twice a week for the past 12 months (which need not to be consecutive) then it’s reasonable to get tested.

“Your GP may request a blood test to check for other disorders such as coeliac disease and a stool sample to check for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, or infections before completing the diagnosis.”

IBS doesn’t have a cure, but there are treatment options, both medical and lifestyle, that can significantly improve the symptoms. These include drinking plenty of water, avoiding hard to digest food and keeping a food diary to enable you to work out what foods are most problematic. The FODMAP diet has also been found to help people manage IBS.’

Your Healthy Living Magazine:

‘Ditch fat-free milk

“Don’t choose fat-free milk alternatives as they are usually enriched with sugar to cover the bland taste,” says Francesca Cappozzo, nutritionist at Maître of Thyme (maitreofthyme.com). “Full fat is better because fat, even if it has more calories, is slowly digested and promotes satiety, and in my opinion tastes 100 per cent better.”’